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9th August 2021 / Comments (4)

Vulpine Men’s Gravel Shorts Review

The Vulpine Mens gravel short, at home on and off the bike

Just as the summer started to heat up in Scotland, Marcus Nicolson and friends set out on A 4-day gravel bikepacking trip, there perfect opportunity to test out a new offering from Vulpine mens gravel short. Read on to find out just how gravel specific shorts fair under testing.

Features 

These mens gravel shorts have a diamond gusset construction built in. This is now the standard approach for ensuring flexible moving on the bike and keeping things comfortable on the saddle at all times. There is a small zipped coin pocket on the right hand side which offers plenty of space for keeping keys and other small valuables safe. The pockets are a fairly standard affair with two front and two rear. The fabric is a cotton/elastane mix which offers a small amount of stretch when you need it on those technical descents.

Diamond Gusset Construction, perfect for comfort and durability

Sizing/Fit and General Impressions

 

The shorts I had on test were a 32” waist. I’m normally a 30/31” waist and these seemed to fit perfectly. In terms of style, these shorts veer much more to the baggy side of cycling clothing. I didn’t wear bib shorts under these during the test period. I imagine things would get a bit too hot and sweaty with a combination of the two. I found the fabric extremely comfortable and the cotton feels nice on the skin after months of wearing synthetics. The website mentions that these shorts can be used for all sorts of riding.

I enjoyed using these for urban commuting and think they are smart looking enough for most of the social occasions I found myself in. It could be handy to have an in-built lock holster above the back pocket, like some competing urban cycling shorts offer but it certainly isn’t a deal breaker. 

I liked the subtle Moss colour which compliments any outfit choice (including the Howies/Advntr collab shirt of course!). 

Durability

It’s nice to have a bit more coverage on the legs when scrambling through scratchy bushes and thorny paths. Any time I’ve got them properly muddy they’ve cleaned up without issue. It’s possible to brush off dried mud without having to put them through the wash, an added bonus of the moss colourway!

 

Overall

I was initially a bit skeptical about gravel specific cycling shorts. However, after a few months under test I’ve grown to really appreciate the versatility of these Vulpine shorts. I’ve found them to be very durable after some proper adventuring. They aren’t the cheapest bit of kit but I’ve put them through some fairly rigorous tests and can attest to their robust construction. While not bursting with special features, these are a great and reliable option for anyone considering some classic looking shorts for summer/early autumn riding.


Images courtesy of Chris Martin

£70
8

"A great and reliable option for anyone considering some classic looking shorts for summer/early autumn riding."

8.0/10

Pros

  • Comfortable for all-day riding
  • Look good off the bike
  • Long(ish) legs offer some protection for riding in thorny bushes

Cons

  • Probably a bit warm for pairing up with bibs

Last modified: 9th August 2021

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Raouligan
Raouligan
1 month ago

Have a pair of these in the bright blue and they’re great, really lovely for riding in, most of my riding is relatively local and these along with SWRVE shorts have been my go to all year. Might slightly prefer the SWRVE but either are great for hanging out in as well. Have worn them with bibs underneath and they’ve been great, even on hotter days!

Raouligan
Raouligan
1 month ago

They’re on sale at the moment as well! Just snagged another pair

Bob
Bob
19 days ago

Hi, does this mean you don’t have to wear anything underneath them? (like roadie bib shorts?)

Michael Drummond
Admin
18 days ago
Reply to  Bob

Thats right yea, its all very much down to personal preference of course, but if your bike and saddle setup is comfy enough you can certainly get away without a chamois.

Might be different story on longer and rougher terrain but its really upto you, many riders choose not to ride with chamois’ at all.

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